What's Happening In Your World
By Victor Trammell The medical field provides a professional career environment that requires skilled and caring people. Health care is an essential function of American society. Health care reform has taken action recently in the U.S. Supreme Court. The work of our nation’s physicians, nurses, and other health care workers is vital to ensure access to medical services for all Americans. In today’s edition of Your Black History, our publication will chronicle the first black woman in America to be become a professional nurse. Her groundbreaking achievement during the late 19th century was certainly commendable. Mary Eliza Mahoney (pictured) was born on April 16, 1845 in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Mahoney worked for 15 years at the New England Hospital for Women and Children (now called the Dimock Community Health Center). The hospital was founded in 1862 by two women who were doctors. The New England Hospital for Women and Children also started the nation’s first nursing school program in 1872. Mary Eliza Mahoney graduated from the  New England Hospital for Women and Children nursing school program in 1905. After graduating from the historic nursing school, Mahoney worked as a private care nurse. She earned an esteemed reputation for the great care she provided for her patients. From 1911 to 1912, Mahoney worked as the director of the Howard Orphan Asylum for Black Children in Long Island, New York. When Mahoney retired from the medical field, she became a social advocate for securing the voting rights of women in America. Mahoney died on January 4, 1926 at the age of 80. In 1993, she was posthumously inducted in the National Women’s Hall of Fame . The Mary Mahoney Memorial Health Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was named in her honor.    

Your Black History: Read About America’s First Black Woman To Become a Nurse

imagesBy Victor Trammell

The medical field provides a professional career environment that requires skilled and caring people.

Health care is an essential function of American society. Health care reform has taken action recently in the U.S. Supreme Court. The work of our nation’s physicians, nurses, and other health care workers is vital to ensure access to medical services for all Americans.

In today’s edition of Your Black History, our publication will chronicle the first black woman in America to be become a professional nurse. Her groundbreaking achievement during the late 19th century was certainly commendable.

Read Original Article At Black Blue Dog

* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust
* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust
Get Your Free Copy of the Black American Money Ebook
Get It Now