What's Happening In Your World
By: Victor “Doc V” Trammell This past summer, Odd Future singer Frank Ocean  gave the hip hop and R&B world a lot to talk about. On The Fourth of July, he used Tumblr to post an open letter, which revealed a homosexual relationship he was involved with in the past. Since then he has released a successful debut solo album called “ Channel Orange .” Until recently, the young singer had not said much about the letter publicly. In newly published interview with GQ Magazine , Frank talks candidly to GQ correspondent Amy Wallace. He is asked about an array of  critical subjects, such as his sexuality, career, and the impact the letter he posted this year had on himself and his fans. Here is an excerpt of the GQ interview: GQ: Let’s talk about your open letter on Tumblr. Posting that must’ve felt like the hardest way. Frank Ocean: Yes, absolutely.   GQ: So why did you do it? Were some people raising questions about the male pronouns in a few of the songs? Frank Ocean: I had Skyped into a listening session that Def Jam was hosting for  Channel Orange,  and one of the journalists, very harmlessly—quotation gestures in the air, “very harmlessly”—wrote a piece and mentioned that. I was just like, “Fuck it. Talk about it, don’t talk about it—talk about  this. ” No more mystery. Through with that.   GQ: You’d written the letter back in December, for inclusion in the liner notes. Were you afraid of the aftermath when you finally posted it in July? Frank Ocean: The night I posted it, I cried like a fucking baby. It was like all the frequency just clicked to a change in my head. All the receptors were now receiving a different signal, and I was happy. I hadn’t been happy in so long. I’ve been sad again since, but it’s a totally different take on sad. There’s just some magic in truth and honesty and openness.   GQ: Exactly how did your perspective change? Frank Ocean: Whatever I said in that letter, before I posted it, seemed so huge. But when you come out the other side, now your brain—instead of receiving fear—sees “Oh, shit happened and nothing happened.” Brain says, “Self, I’m fine.” I look around, and I’m touching my fucking limbs, and I’m good. Before anybody called me and said congratulations or anything nice, it had already changed. It wasn’t from outside. It was completely in here, in my head.   GQ: Did you worry it would derail your career? Frank Ocean: I had those fears. In black music, we’ve got so many leaps and bounds to make with acceptance and tolerance in regard to that issue. It reflects something just ingrained, you know. When I was growing up, there was nobody in my family—not even my mother—who I could look to and be like, “I know you’ve never said anything homophobic.” So, you know, you worry about people in the business who you’ve heard talk that way. Some of my heroes coming up talk recklessly like that. It’s tempting to give those views and words—that ignorance—more attention than they deserve. Very tempting.   To read Frank Oceans full interview, click the following link: http://www.gq.com/entertainment/music/201212/frank-ocean-interview-gq-december-2012?currentPage=1

Frank Ocean Speaks On Sexuality And His Coming Out Letter

By: Victor “Doc V” Trammell

This past summer, Odd Future singer Frank Ocean gave the hip hop and R&B world a lot to talk about. On The Fourth of July, he used Tumblr to post an open letter, which revealed a homosexual relationship he was involved with in the past. Since then he has released a successful debut solo album called “Channel Orange.” Until recently, the young singer had not said much about the letter publicly. In newly published interview with GQ Magazine, Frank talks candidly to GQ correspondent Amy Wallace. He is asked about an array of  critical subjects, such as his sexuality, career, and the impact the letter he posted this year had on himself and his fans. Here is an excerpt of the GQ interview:

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