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Big brother is at it again, this time going after your personal phone logs. Local law enforcement organizations are lobbying Congress to require wireless providers to store text messages for two years, in case they’re needed during criminal investigations. The proposal submitted to Congress by the law enforcement lobby would require wireless providers, such as AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint, to store user’s text messages for at least two years. The provision they’re lobbying for would be a part of an updated 1986 privacy law for the cloud storage era. Members of the law enforcement lobby cite an increased use of text messages as the reason for the change. CNET reports:   As the popularity of text messages has exploded in recent years, so has their use in criminal investigations and civil lawsuits. They have been introduced as evidence in  armed robbery , cocaine distribution , and  wire fraud  prosecutions. In one 2009 case in Michigan, wireless provider SkyTel turned over the contents of 626,638 SMS messages, a figure described by a federal judge as “staggering.”  As it stands now, different wireless companies have different standards for storing text messages, with some storing them for months, and others not at all. “This issue is not addressed in the current proposal before the committee and yet it will become even more important in the future,” the law enforcement lobby warned. Groups which comprise the law enforcement lobby include  the National District Attorneys’ Association, the National Sheriffs’ Association, and the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies.    

Don’t Look Now, But Cops are Asking Congress For Your Personal Text Messages

Big brother is at it again, this time going after your personal phone logs. Local law enforcement organizations are lobbying Congress to require wireless providers to store text messages for two years, in case they’re needed during criminal investigations.

The proposal submitted to Congress by the law enforcement lobby would require wireless providers, such as AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint, to store user’s text messages for at least two years. The provision they’re lobbying for would be a part of an updated 1986 privacy law for the cloud storage era.

Members of the law enforcement lobby cite an increased use of text messages as the reason for the change.

Read Original Article At Techyville


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